SONGSMITH.htm
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Music has always been a significant component in my life. My tastes are eclectic, and about the only thing that limits what's on the sound system at any given moment is my mood. Although I am particularly partial to traditional Celtic,

I started learning to play guitar in 1967, and moved to a 12-string acoustic in 1974, thanks to a tornado and a bit of luck in a local pawnshop. A few years ago, I acquired a 12-string Yamaha that now serves as my primary "ax".

Those aforementioned Celtic influences, and a background as a 60s "folkie", are much in evidence in my singing and songwriting, the latter activity being something I've been doing for thirty years or so. In 1994 I discovered Filk, and things took a turn for the weird.

When most people think of Filk, which I define as "science fiction and fantasy-based folk music", they think of genre-inspired words put to existing and/or popular tunes. Early on, I fell under some good influences, notably Cynthia McQuillin, Leslie Fish, Joe Bethancourt and Michael Longcor, so when I began to write filk, it was to tunes of my own crafting.

One thing led to another, including being asked fairly often, "Do you have a tape?", and I found myself involved in some of the best fun I've ever had. The answer to that question became "Not yet, but we're working on it", while I spent several months of odd hours in the living-room studio and multi-talented hands of my longtime friend Bob West, Jr. Bob engineered the tape, which we called The Ladies of Trade Town, did the mixing, played exquisite lead guitar and kick-butt bass on several tracks, and wrote two of the songs - "Don't Look Too Close In The Mirror" and "Lullaby From A Horror Writer". My husband George also joined the fun, playing bass on several of the tracks.

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Teller of Tales

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